Review

Maserati Quattroporte saloon (2004-2012)

Maserati Quattroporte saloon (2004-2012)

reviewed by Carbuyer

Pros
  • Performance, brakes and handling
  • Style and exclusivity
  • Pleasing engine noise
Cons
  • Very expensive
  • Costly extras
  • Lack of a diesel option

Literally translating as 'four-door', the Italian word 'Quattroporte' still manages to sound exotic despite it's humble meaning. Maserati's luxury saloon is available in three guises, all receiving engines tweaked by owners Ferrari. Entry level models are fitted with a 4.2-litre V8, whilst S and GT S models receive a larger, more powerful 4.7-litre unit producing 430bhp and 440bhp respectively. All models have very strong performance and a typically Italian soundtrack. Exquisitely made and fabulous to drive, the Quattroporte aims to attract existing Mercedes-Benz S-Class and BMW 7 Series buyers who require an added dose of style. The introduction of a new automatic gearbox has improved driving characteristics immeasurably from previous versions, lowering shift times and reducing jerkiness.

MPG, running costs & CO2

1.0 / 5

The Quattroporte drinks fuel at an alarming rate

In order to achieve the quoted 19mpg combined fuel economy figure in a Maserati Quattroporte, drivers will require a very strong reslove. Range is impressive though as a 90 litre fuel tank is fitted. Producing 345g/km of CO2 the Quattroporte is a heavy polluter and as a result suffers the highest tax bill available, £460 per year. Expect very heavy servicing and tyre bills especially if covering high mileage.

Interior & comfort

2.0 / 5

The stylish appearance continues in the cabin

Fans of a cosseting ride are best suited to standard and S versions as the GT S can feel quite harsh on bumpy back roads. The rear seats are spacious and very luxurious featuring sumptuous leather and carpet, plus separate climate controls. An optional comfort pack installs heated massaging seats.

Practicality & boot space

2.5 / 5

The cabin is well designed and parking sensors are supplied

The boot in the Quattroporte is smaller than in it's competitors, holding 450 litre of luggage compared to the BMW 7 Series' 500 litres, but it does feature several tie-down hoops and some very luxurious carpet. Unfortunately, the rear seats do not fold down, which seriously limits load carrying ability. Both front and rear cabins ooze class providing plenty of space with well designed storage areas, cup-holders and tray tables. The recessed central rear seat is tiny however due to the large transmission tunnel and is suitable only for children or very small adults. Parking can be tricky due to the large overhangs and long body but rear parking sensors are fitted as standard.

Reliability & safety

2.0 / 5

Surprisingly reliable, now under Ferrari ownership

Maserati don't have the best reputation for reliability, but owners Ferrari have recently built a new factory for their luxury brand and as a result quality and reliability levels have soared. No major issues have been reported following the introduction of a new automatic gearbox and cabin materials are first class. Electronic stability and traction control systems aid traction on slippery surfaces whilst huge brakes have the big saloon covered in the event of an emergency stop. Six airbags protect the occupants.

Engines, drive & performance

3.5 / 5

Hugely entertaining to drive, providing one of the best noises in the business

Owners looking to get the most out of the Quattroporte from behind the wheel should opt for the slightly harder sprung GT S version. Fitted with the larger 4.7-litre engine producing 434bhp it also features a sports exhaust system that when in Sport mode produces the most incredible noise. The new automatic gearbox, featuring racy shift-paddles works very well and represents a huge step forward from earlier models. Show it some challenging corners and the two-tonne Maserati continues to impress, diving wherever you point it.

Price, value for money & options

1.5 / 5

The big Maserati has character in spades

With frighteningly high list prices the Maserati Quattroporte is quite clearly a very premium product. Similar performance and space are offered in other brands from BMW and Audi but none possess the exclusivity and character of the Italian maker's luxury saloon. Tick several of the cost options however and the price swiftly rockets towards a six figure sum.

What the others say

3.9 / 5
based on 4 reviews
  • 4.0 / 5
    As with the standard model, the GT S shares its 4.7-litre V8 engine with the GranTurismo S. But, thanks to a sports exhaust, power is up 9bhp to 434bhp while torque climbs to 490Nm. A reworked automatic gearbox has boosted shift times, while the suspension set-up has been stiffened and lowered to improve handling.
  • 4.5 / 5
    From our perspective, the Executive GT seems like something of an oddball choice, because the big Maser is such a great car to be sat up-front in. Its steering feels alive from the off, diving for the apex as if your life depended on it. Sneeze at 100mph and you'll be heading straight for the Armco, which in my book is exactly as it should be in a proper sporting saloon.
  • 13.0 / 20
    Sounds better when you say it in Italian, but the English translation - 'four-door' - is more helpful in explaining it. Basically a big, cool, Ferrari-powered saloon. Respect. 
  • 4.0 / 5
    The Quattroporte may have a glamorous sounding name, but the badge simply means 'four door' in Italian. However, the Maserati is much more than merely an everyday saloon. It's exquisitely styled, utterly unique and offers storming performance along with refinement.

Last updated 
28 Jun 2013

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