Review

Volkswagen Golf Cabriolet

£22,540 - £29,325

The Volkswagen Golf Cabriolet is a fun and stylish car that demands few of the compromises typically associated with convertibles. For example, the rear cabin is reasonably spacious, it's practical (you can drop the rear seats to increase boot space and there are plenty of storage cubbies) and it feels very much like the car on which it's based, the excellent VW Golf hatchback, to drive.

Inside, it looks and feels like that model, too, as the dashboard is fashioned from high-quality, durable materials with touches of brushed aluminium, plus you get hard-wearing yet comfortable seats.

The Golf Cabriolet is powered by a choice of smooth and efficient petrol and diesel engines and comes in a range of trim levels, rising from basic S to sporty GTI. Regardless of what trim level you go for, the folding roof is electrically powered. It operates at speeds up to 19mph and takes just 9.5 seconds to open or close. As a result, you can take full advantage of the sunshine, or close it at the first hint of rain. In addition, all versions have air-conditioning, alloy wheels and a DAB digital radio.

On the road, the Golf is largely free of the mild body shakes that can afflict some soft-top cars over bumps and poor surfaces. It's very quiet at high speeds, too, and it's so refined at low speeds you’d think it had a solid roof.

The Golf Cabriolet isn’t cheap, but then few convertibles are. However, it’ll hold its value well, so you should get a good price for it when you sell it. Rivals include the more expensive but equally impressive Audi A3 Cabriolet, the slightly underwhelming Vauxhall Cascada and the sporty BMW 2 Series Cabriolet.

For its blend of performance, price, fuel economy and resale value, the 2.0-litre TDI BlueMotion SE diesel is our pick of the Golf Cabriolet range for high-mileage drivers. However, drivers who do only average mileage should consider the reasonably efficient and decently priced 1.4-litre TSI SE petrol model.