Review

Nissan X-Trail SUV

Price  £23,195 - £31,345

Nissan X-Trail SUV

reviewed by Carbuyer

Pros
  • Easy to drive
  • Reasonable running costs
  • Smart looks inside and out
Cons
  • Seven seats cost extra
  • Big wheels spoil ride quality
  • Just the one underpowered engine

At a glance

The greenest
1.6 dCi 130 Visia 2WD 5dr £23,195
The cheapest
1.6 dCi 130 Visia 2WD 5dr £23,195
The fastest
1.6 dCi 130 Visia 2WD 5dr £23,195
Top of the range
1.6 dCi 130 Tekna 4WD 5dr £31,345

“In looks and ability the X-Trail resembles the popular Nissan Qashqai, except it’s a little bigger in order to accommodate an optional third row of seats in the boot.”

The first Nissan X-Trail was a boxy, utilitarian SUV, but this latest version is a more stylish, car-like model. In looks and ability, it resembles the very popular Nissan Qashqai except it's a little bigger in order to accommodate an optional third row of seats in the boot. Disregard that, and the Qashqai looks almost as practical but better value.

Other rivals include the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4, but if you need two extra seats, the Hyundai Santa Fe (where they’re optional) and Kia Sorento (where they come as standard) are closer competitors.

With the X-Trail's revised looks have come improvements in build quality, specification and road manners. Four-wheel drive is an option – as it is on the Qashqai – but the X-Trail's focus is squarely on tarmac. It's car-like to drive, with minimal body lean, light steering and plenty of grip in corners.

Only one engine is available (a 1.6-litre diesel), but unfortunately it's not very powerful. It is economical, though, which should appeal to large families on a budget, owners who need to tow something or company-car drivers looking to reduce their tax bill. For people who prefer their car to do the gearchanging, there's also the option of CVT automatic transmission, but we wouldn’t recommend it.

The X-Trail's interior is attractively laid out, and fit and finish are generally good. There are four trim levels, with even the basic Visia specification offering air-conditioning, alloy wheels and Bluetooth phone connectivity as standard. Top-spec Tekna brings power-adjustable leather seats and a range of driver assistance features. On the downside, DAB digital radio doesn’t make an appearance until n-tec, the second-highest trim level. On the other hand, all versions above Visia have an electrically operated panoramic glass roof that floods the dark cabin with light.

For its reasonable price, sensible specification, added practicality and improved resale prospects, the X-Trail Acenta 1.6-litre dCi 130 2WD fitted with the optional third row of seats is our pick of the range.

MPG, running costs & CO2

4.5 / 5

The Nissan X-Trail’s small diesel engine does well to achieve reasonable fuel economy and emissions for such a large vehicle

Engines, drive & performance

3.7 / 5

It doesn’t offer boundless performance, but the Nissan X-Trail makes good use of what it has

Interior & comfort

3.8 / 5

Nowhere does the new Nissan X-Trail demonstrate how much it’s changed compared to the previous model than from the driver’s seat

Practicality & boot space

4.1 / 5

With a seats-up capacity of 550 litres and a seats-down figure of 1,982 litres, the Nissan X-Trail’s boot dwarfs rivals’

Reliability & safety

4 / 5

Even owner of the most basic Nissan X-Trail can rest assured they have some of the most sophisticated safety technology offered on any mainstream car

What the others say

3.7 / 5
based on 3 reviews
3 / 5
“The Nissan X-Trail continues Nissan's fine run of recent form in building family-friendly crossovers.”
4 / 5
“The Nissan X-Trail is cheaper to buy and run than most direct rivals and comes with plenty of standard equipment.”
4 / 5
“It's more of a bigger replacement for the Qashqai +2 than a bona fide ‘new X-Trail’ in the traditional sense – it's far less utilitarian.”

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