Review

Audi Q7 SUV

Price  £44,995 - £65,220

Audi Q7 SUV

reviewed by Carbuyer

Pros
  • Spacious seven-seat interior
  • Strong performance
  • Huge boot space
Cons
  • Cumbersome size
  • High running costs
  • BMW X5 feels more up-to-date

At a glance

The greenest
3.0 TDI 204PS quattro S line Plus 5dr £51,155
The cheapest
3.0 TDI 204PS quattro SE 5dr £44,995
The fastest
4.2 TDI quattro S line 5dr £57,720
Top of the range
4.2 TDI quattro S line Sport Edition 5dr £65,220

"The Audi Q7 is a vast SUV with seven seats and plenty of kerb appeal, but it feels dated and its four-star safety score isn't on par with more modern rivals."

The sheer size of the Audi Q7 makes it hard work to drive in town, but its seven-seat interior and imposing looks have made it a popular choice and sales have been impressive. However, the Q7 first hit the road in 2006 and its small colour infotainment screen and plastic air vents now look rather dated. A new Audi Q7 is expected some time in 2015.

Its running costs are also a bit old-school: the Q7 returns less than 40mpg and your annual road tax bill will be between £265 and £485. By comparison, the latest BMW X5 can crack 50mpg and has a £145 tax bill thanks to the addition of a frugal two-wheel-drive model.

The Q7 comes with a choice of three diesel engines – two versions of a 3.0-litre TDI engine and a more powerful 4.2-litre engine. They’re quiet and smooth, and coupled with the quattro four-wheel-drive system, you can be confident that the Q7 will give you amazing levels of grip in the corners and on slippery surfaces. But the ride is on the firm side, even in comfort mode.

Having recently dropped the only version that came in under £45,000, the Q7 range now starts at more than £46,000 with the S line trim. It offers plenty of kit as standard, but rather annoyingly doesn’t come with sat nav. For that, along with bigger wheels and a reversing camera, you need to go for the S line Plus. There's also a couple of further trims – Style and Sport - that make your Q7 look more rugged, or more sporty.

So, while the Audi Q7 is still hugely practical and has definite kerb appeal, its newer competitors are cheaper to run. It might be sensible to wait for more news about its successor or try to bag a big discount on the current Q7 before production ends.

Our top pick is the Audi Q7 3.0 TDI 245 S line, because it delivers virtually all the kit you need, sat-nav aside, with strong performance.

MPG, running costs & CO2

2.5 / 5

The Audi Q7 3.0-litre TDI will return almost 40mpg, but a BMW X5 will cost much less to run

Engines, drive & performance

3.2 / 5

The Audi Q7 is a big car and its bulk is unavoidable - especially on tight country roads

Interior & comfort

3.7 / 5

The Audi Q7 is spacious, but the suspension is quite firm

Practicality & boot space

4.3 / 5

Even with seven passengers, the Audi Q7 offers a decent-sized boot

Reliability & safety

4 / 5

The Audi Q7 is well built and has a durable interior, but the Mercedes M-Class is safer

What the others say

3.5 / 5
based on 4 reviews
4 / 5
Anyone looking to downsize is unlikely to consider the Q7, but it's still a great choice for motorists in the market for a capable luxury 4x4. The more efficient engines and fuel-saving technology are a welcome upgrade.
10 / 20
Even by stupidly huge SUV standards the Q7 is stupidly huge. Hilariously, there's a hybrid version for California, liked by the stupidly huge Governor Schwarzenegger.
3 / 5
The Audi Q7 is very impressive in some areas, but equally disappointing in others. If you can afford to buy and run one, the Q7 is an appealing choice.
4.5 / 5
The Q7 may be Audi's first full size 4x4 but like alternatives such as the BMW X5 and Mercedes M-Class it's firmly designed for staying on tarmac rather than tackling harsh terrain.

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What owners say

4.4379310344828
4.4 /5 based on 29 reviews
62%
 people would recommend this car to a friend
Last updated
11 Dec 2014
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