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Mitsubishi Outlander SUV (2007-2013)

"Mitsubishi’s Outlander is practical, neatly styled and good to drive. It’s expensive, though."

Carbuyer Rating

2.5 out of 5

Owners Rating

4.4 out of 5

Read owner reviews

Pros

  • Smart, modern looks
  • Practical and spacious cabin
  • Enjoyable to drive

Cons

  • Uncomfortable, tricky to use third row seats
  • Not the cheapest 4x4
  • Base cars’ safety kit

The Outlander is Mitsubishi’s compact 4x4 contender. It rivals the likes of the Land Rover Freelander 2, yet features a third row of seats. They’re small, but handy for those occasions if you have a couple more children. The styling is tidy inside and out, and people carrier-like features such as sliding, easy-fold seats make it a practical choice. Front-wheel-drive models offer improved fuel economy at the expensive of off-road ability – although many Outlanders will never see terrain more challenging than a gravel car park.

MPG, running costs & CO2

Good economy and fixed-price servicing option

The 2.2-litre diesel is mated to a standard six-speed manual box or an optional automated manual, like that found in the Evo X supersaloon. Road Tax costs £155 and £235 respectively, while fuel economy is 44.8mpg and 39.2mpg, depending on gearbox, for four-wheel-drive models. The manual-only two-wheel-drive car does 46.3mpg. As with all Mitsubishis you can buy fixed-price servicing to keep running costs predictable, while insurance should be competitive.

Engines, drive & performance

Handles well and diesels are strong

A 2.2-litre diesel is the only engine available, and it’s smooth and powerful. The steering in all versions is accurate and quick, with the Outlander responding to inputs at the wheel more like a conventional car than a high-riding off-roader. The six-speed manual transmission is light and easy to use, but the suspension sometimes struggles to smother sharp bumps and ripples in the road. A rotary dial allows you to choose 4x4 mode, enabling the Outlander to venture off-road if you need it to.

Interior & comfort

Quiet, comfortable with space for four adults

The 2.2-litre diesel – the only engine option offered in the Outlander – is quiet on the move. Adding to the strong refinement, the Outlander’s cabin is impressively resistant to wind and road noise. What’s more, it provides good comfort for four adults, although the middle seat in the rear is a little bit tight for a fifth. The third row of seats right at the back of the Mitsubishi are strictly for children, though, because they are flat and quite cramped.

Practicality & boot space

Lots of storage and flexibility throughout cabin

Split tailgate offers brilliant access to the huge boot, and a switch in the side panel folds the second row seats. They slide and recline, too, to boost legroom or luggage space. Use the third row seats and luggage space plummets from 541 litres to 220 litres. Cabin storage includes a twin-lidded glovebox and a small centre armrest cubby. Four large bottle holders in the doors are useful, as is the upper glovebox’s cooling or warming function on top-spec models.

Reliability & safety

Reliable, but entry-level model gets just two airbags

The interior feels well built and sturdy, even if the plastics used look a bit hard and shiny for a car costing so much. Electronic stability control comes as standard on all models, although entry-level GX1 and GX2 models lack the curtain airbags that are standard on higher spec cars. All models come with Isofix child seat mountings too. The Outlander doesn’t feature in the Driver Power Survey, but Mitsubishi has a good reputation for reliability.

Price, value for money & options

Expensive to buy compared to rivals

The Outlander isn’t as cheap to buy as you might expect – Peugeot and Citroen sell near-identical alternatives for less. Range-topping Juro models are particularly expensive, although they have the spec to justify it. Mid-spec GX3 makes most sense in the range: it has alloys, Bluetooth and cruise control. This is also the only version to come with two-wheel drive.

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Richard is a former editor of Carbuyer, as well as sister site DrivingElectric.com, and he's now Deputy Editor at Auto Express. Having spent a decade working in the automotive industry, he understands exactly what makes new car buyers tick.

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