In-depth reviews

Renault Kadjar SUV - Interior & comfort

The Renault Kadjar is very comfortable on the road and the interior is plush

Carbuyer Rating

3.8 out of 5

Owners Rating

4.3 out of 5

Read owner reviews
Interior & comfort Rating

4.0 out of 5

The Renault Kadjar’s interior is well built and has soft-touch plastics everywhere you’d expect. There are three well-equipped trim levels after the entry-level Play model was discontinued in 2020.

The high-spec models are expensive, though, and option packs can further increase the price towards mid-range Audi Q3 money if you get carried away when ordering your car.

Unlike its sister model the Nissan Qashqai, the Kadjar does without clever ride-control systems, as its suspension has been finely tuned already. It only becomes unsettled on really rough roads or pothole-ridden country lanes; most of the time it’s incredibly comfortable.

Generally, the Kadjar is also pretty quiet on the move, although there's a little wind noise from around the windscreen pillars when driving at speed. Road noise is also more noticeable with the large 19-inch alloy wheels fitted.

Renault Kadjar dashboard

The Kadjar’s dashboard plastics mostly consist of soft-touch materials and the digital instrument cluster is a neat touch. The overall look doesn’t feel quite as fresh, though, while the black and dark-grey finish is a little gloomy compared to the funky layout of other Renault models such as the smaller Renault Captur SUV or the Renault Clio supermini.

Equipment

Every Kadjar model features an electronic parking brake, Bluetooth, USB and MP3 connectivity, DAB digital radio, dual-zone air-conditioning and LED daytime running lights.

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Iconic also includes a reversing camera, keyless entry, rain-sensing windscreen wipers and automatic headlights. This trim level also gets Renault’s R-LINK 2 infotainment system with sat nav as well as 19-inch alloy wheels.

The S Edition has a fixed glass sunroof, rear USB sockets, part-synthetic leather trim for the seats and extra chrome trim, plus full LED headlights, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror and grey skid plates.

At the top of the range is the Kadjar GT Line. It comes with heated leather seats, different 19-inch alloys, autonomous parking, emergency braking and blind-spot monitoring on top of the S Edition's kit. 

Options

Before the Kadjar's facelift in 2018, Renault offered plenty of options. It has now slimmed the range down and made the trim levels more generous, so the only optional extra you can choose is a spare wheel in place of a tyre inflation kit. This was to make the buying process easier for customers, as you now only need to choose the specification, engine and paint colour.

Technology

The R-LINK 2 touchscreen system is about as technologically advanced as the Kadjar gets, but that's no bad thing and it includes Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. It doesn't look too flashy, but it's quite clear and easy to use, especially the home screen. Things get a little more fiddly as you go through submenus and there are no knobs or buttons to scroll through menus quickly, but at least the screen is quite responsive and designed not to reflect bright sunlight.

The sat-nav system is easy enough to use once you know what you're doing. It can be quite fiddly to enter a destination, though. The map itself is clear to read and while spoken instructions are few and far between, they're easy to follow and the supplementary instructions on the digital display are neat, crisp and clear, so following guidance is easy.

Higher-spec Kadjar models come with a BOSE stereo, which is quite impressive considering the price. With the volume turned up high, there are some rattles, but sound quality is generally clear for most people.

The Kadjar also has some advanced safety and driving assistance technology fitted, or available from the options list. The lane-departure warning system has three intensities and three volumes to warn you, which is quite unpleasant in practice, but at least it gets your attention. The system also picks up on non-reflective paint.

Top-spec versions are able to park autonomously, too. There are front and rear parking sensors, as well as a rear camera, so visibility is pretty good. It can perform a parallel park, bay park, or angled bay park, plus it'll exit the space for you as well. The parallel park is quite effective, but we find that these systems generally take quite a bit longer than just doing it yourself.

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