In-depth reviews

Nissan Ariya SUV - Range, charging & running costs

The Nissan Ariya isn’t the cheapest electric SUV to buy, but it offers strong range figures and low running costs

Carbuyer Rating

4.2 out of 5

Range, charging & running costs Rating

4.0 out of 5

Nissan is first and foremost a mainstream brand, so the Ariya is somewhat of an outlier in terms of market positioning. Starting at around £43,000, the Ariya is more expensive than some rivals such as the Skoda Enyaq, which starts from under the £40k mark. The Japanese brand will argue that this is because the Ariya is more premium than rivals; while this is certainly true in terms of interior quality, the Nissan brand doesn’t quite have the same kerb appeal as, say, Volkswagen. 

Regardless, entry-level Ariya examples come with plenty of standard equipment, so there is little need to upgrade to higher-spec models – these can come dangerously close to £50,000, which puts them in the same price range as serious premium offerings from the likes of Audi and BMW.

The Nissan Ariya will be most appealing to company-car drivers, however. Like all electric cars, the Ariya slots into the lowest Benefit-in-Kind (BiK) bracket, meaning rock-bottom tax bills.

Nissan Ariya range & charging

At launch, Nissan is offering the Ariya with a choice of two battery sizes: 63kWh and 87kWh. Nissan claims the former will allow for up to 250 miles of driving on a single charge, while the latter will be able to manage an increased 310 miles before you need to plug it in.

During our test drive, we got behind the wheel of the smaller battery option and were able to easily extract around 235 miles; drivers with a lighter right foot may be able to squeeze out even more. This equates to an efficiency figure of around 3.7 miles/kWh. These figures are about the same as what can be expected from rivals; the 58kWh Enyaq quotes around 258 miles. However, the Toyota bZ4X can travel over 300 miles even in base specification.

Basic Ariyas get a 7.4kW (AC) on-board charger, allowing for a full charge overnight using a standard home wallbox. Higher-spec Evolve models better this with a 22kW on-board charger, enabling use of faster AC charge points, though this type of charger is less common. Regardless, all Ariya models get 130kW (DC) rapid charging, for a 20-80% in under 30 minutes when connected to a compatible public charger. The sat nav can suggest charging stops along your route if necessary, and precondition the battery so it’s in its optimum state for fast charging when you arrive at a chargepoint. Some rivals make buyers pay extra to get access to the fastest charging speeds, so it’s good to see all Ariya owners will be able to top up quickly.

Another standard feature that is usually an optional extra on most EVs at this price point is a heat pump. This compresses refrigerant to warm air passing through from the outside, reducing the need to use the car’s electric heating system. Consequently, range is improved in winter months where a portion of the car’s charge would have instead been used to power the heater.

Insurance groups

Insurance groups haven't been finalised for the Nissan Ariya yet, but it's likely to cost more to insure than a Nissan Qashqai.

Warranty

Nissan offers all of its models with a three-year, 60,000-mile warranty, and the Ariya is no different in this respect. This also includes an eight-year, 100,00-mile warranty for the battery pack – something that should provide peace of mind to those worrying about this component’s longevity.

It is worth noting, however, that some rival manufacturers do offer more compelling warranties with their cars. Kia offers a seven-year warranty with the EV6, while the Hyundai Ioniq 5 comes with five years of cover.

Servicing

One of the main benefits of EVs are their lack of moving parts; therefore, there is much less of a requirement for servicing. The Nissan Ariya will likely need servicing just once every two years for brake fluid replacement, a new pollen filter and a general inspection.

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