Volkswagen Polo GTI hatchback (2010-2017) - Interior & comfort

The high-quality interior is a stand-out feature of the Volkswagen Polo GTI, if a little conservative

Carbuyer Rating

3.8 out of 5

Interior & comfort Rating

4.5 out of 5

Although the Volkswagen Polo GTI offers a pleasant environment to spend time in, there are notable omissions from the list of standard equipment considering the car’s purchase price.

Volkswagen Polo GTI dashboard

It’s hard to overstate the quality of the Polo GTI’s interior, and nowhere is this more evident than in the dashboard. There’s a simple elegance to it, and it certainly feels representative of the Polo GTI’s near-£20,000 starting price.

There’s plenty of adjustment in the driver’s seat and steering column, meaning finding a good driving position should be straightforward for most people. The pedals and gearstick are placed exactly in the right position to be comfortable – both are ergonomic delights.

Compared to the Renault Clio Renaultsport’s interior, which can feel like you’re sitting in a PlayStation, and the rather space-age look of the Ford Fiesta ST’s dash, the Polo GTI’s is a masterclass in minimalism, with easy-to-read dials at a minimum and the chunky, well labelled lighting and heater controls feel like they’re quality bits of kit.

Equipment

Just one version of the VW Polo GTI is available, and it comes with a decent amount of standard equipment. Highlights include a wide range of sporty trims both inside and out, including a smart set of alloy wheels and racy interior trims.

That’s in addition to the equipment fitted to lesser models. Here you’ll find air-conditioning (but no climate control as standard), a 6.5-inch touchscreen, a CD player, USB connectivity and the ability to read out text messages. More pragmatic kit includes electric windows, a trip computer, electric mirrors and LED lighting.

Options

Fortunately, the most notable omissions from the list of standard equipment are available on the options list. Sat-nav is a £700 option, while climate control will set you back nearly £400. Curtain airbags are another strange omission. They’re expensive at £650, but a worthwhile addition.

An electric sunroof is available for £850 and cruise control is £400 extra. Owners who live in cities might benefit from the front and rear parking sensors (£300) or the £250 rear parking camera. MirrorLink is another option worth considering, as it mirrors your smartphone’s screen on the car’s display, allowing you to operate certain apps.

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