It’s here: all-new Range Rover Sport unveiled

Following the release of the full-sized Range Rover, its smaller sibling gets sleeker styling and an equally tech-filled cabin

  • Evolutionary design
  • Fully-electric model coming soon
  • On sale Autumn 2022 from £79,125

Hot on the heels of the launch of the all-new Range Rover, Land Rover has revealed the latest rendition of its smaller sibling: the Range Rover Sport. This new SUV benefits from updated technology and an electrified engine line-up, while also taking several minimalist design cues from the full-size Range Rover.

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The new Range Rover Sport is due to arrive in showrooms this autumn, with prices starting from £79,125 – nearly £15,000 more than the old car’s asking price. The Sport’s main competitors are equally expensive, however, with the luxury SUV renewing its rivalry with the Porsche Cayenne and BMW X5.

At launch, buyers will be able to choose from two trim levels: SE and Autobiography. There will also be the option for ‘Dynamic’ styling packages and a limited-run First Edition model with all the bells and whistles.

2022 Range Rover Sport: exterior

At first glance, it may appear that not much has changed for this third generation of Range Rover Sport. However, just like the newly revised Range Rover, Land Rover has opted to refine and perfect the car’s design language. The front end of the Sport is much sharper than before, with a slimmer set of LED headlights; these feature up to 1.2 million micromirrors which can direct light in order to provide the best visibility in the dark.

Similarities with the Range Rover continue along the flanks of the new Sport because it gets flush, pop-out door handles and concealed window finishers and glass, in order to create a more seamless design. Yet, unlike the full-size SUV, the Range Rover Sport does not get that car’s vertical taillight design. Instead, it has an illuminated horizontal strip, similar to that seen on the smaller Velar and Evoque. 

For buyers wanting to focus more on the ‘Sport’ part of this new Range Rover’s name, the optional Dynamic pack adds a more aggressive front and rear bumper design. As standard, the Range Rover Sport gets 20-inch wheels, with top-of-the-range models receiving 23-inch alloys.

Interior and technology

The current generation of Range Rover Sport has been on sale since 2013 and while incremental updates have been made to keep that car feeling fresh, the luxury SUV was well overdue an overhaul. The new Range Rover Sport’s interior is, like the rest of the car, a condensed version of what is found in the full-size Range Rover. As is expected of a car of this calibre, the entire cabin is wrapped in luxurious materials such as leather. However, for vegan and environmentally conscious buyers, the Sport is also available with luxury PU (polyurethane) upholstery and recycled ‘marine plastic’ floor mats.

Mounted on the centre of the dashboard is a large, 13.1-inch infotainment touchscreen. This runs Jaguar-Land Rover’s latest PIVI Pro software and sits above a set of digitised physical climate control dials. Peering through the gap in the steering wheel, the new Range Rover Sport also gets an even more expansive 13.7-inch digital instrument cluster. Drivers can configure this to display various car functions, as they can with the car’s full-colour head-up display, which projects onto the windscreen, directly in the line of sight.

Despite looking relatively similar on the outside, the new Range Rover Sport has, in fact, grown in size for this third generation. The wheelbase (the distance between the front and rear wheels) has increased by a not insubstantial 75mm, which means that rear passengers should be greeted with much greater legroom than before. While it has not been confirmed, we also expect the new Sport to feature a slightly larger boot, to further benefit practicality.

Engines and mechanicals

The new Range Rover Sport sits on the same MLA-Flex underpinnings as its bigger brother. The key advantage for this new platform is that it enables Land Rover to add a fully electric powertrain, which means a Range Rover Sport EV could be coming soon.

For now, however, buyers have the choice of a range of semi-electrified options. Entry-level cars are driven by petrol or diesel six-cylinder engines which benefit from 48-volt mild-hybrid assistance. For more power, there is a muscular 4.4-litre V8 with 523bhp – this can get from 0-60mph in just 4.3 seconds. Of course, an even faster, SVR-badged model is on the way, too.

The most efficient versions of the new Range Rover Sport are undoubtedly the plug-in hybrid models. There are two to choose from; both use a 3.0-litre six-cylinder petrol engine mated to an electric motor to provide up-to 503bhp. Both cars’ electric motors are powered by a 38.2kWh battery, which Land Rover claims gives them an electric-only range of 70 miles.

While Range Rovers are renowned for their off-road prowess, most spend the majority of their lives prowling busy city streets. Thankfully, Land Rover has gone to an effort to make the undeniably large Sport a lot more manoeuvrable. The new car gets the same four-wheel-steering system as the new Range Rover, which turns the rear wheels in an opposite direction to those at the front. This results in a turning circle of just 11 metres – two metres tighter than the outgoing SUV.

Of course, if you do decide to take your new Range Rover Sport off-road, you can make use of its improved All-Terrain-Response system. This can tailor the throttle and braking response of the car while navigating rough terrain and even features a special off-road cruise control function. A new Dynamic Air Suspension system can also raise the car’s ride height to overcome obstacles, while the Sport’s maximum wading depth tops out at an impressive 900mm.

Need a rough-and-ready off-roader? Check out our list of the Top 10 best 4x4s

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