Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo estate review

"The Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo has all the attributes of the saloon but with more space and a unique style of its own"

Carbuyer Rating

4.4 out of 5

Pros

  • Increased space
  • Stunning performance
  • Distinctive design

Cons

  • No rear-wheel-drive version
  • Range could be even better
  • Expensive

The Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo is the estate version of the all-electric Porsche Taycan saloon, although such a simple distinction doesn't really do it justice. Along with its elongated roof, the Cross Turismo gets a fashionable, rugged look that's likely to strike a chord with buyers. 

An off-road pack emphasises this with plastic wheel arches and cladding, along with a 30mm boost in ground clearance. These changes don't exactly make the Cross Turismo an off-roader but should provide reassurance on a rough track or snow-covered road. There's also 47mm of extra headroom in the rear seats compared with the standard Taycan, courtesy of the redesigned roof, and more space for luggage too. These changes also give Porsche a model with no direct Tesla rival, as the Tesla Model S is only available to order as a four-door saloon.

Boot space increases to as much as 446 litres (1,212 litres with the rear seats folded down), which is an increase on the 366 litres in the regular Taycan. However, that's still a lot smaller than a boxy rival like the conventionally powered Mercedes E63 Estate, which has a large 640-litre boot. One trick the E63 can't replicate is the 84-litre 'frunk' storage space under the Porsche's bonnet - every inch of the equivalent space in the Mercedes is taken up by the engine.

The brawny Taycan can rival just about any rival for acceleration too; the Turbo S Cross Turismo takes just 2.9 seconds to get from 0-62mph and feels incredibly quick in the process. Its dual electric motors can produce up to 751bhp in 'overboost' mode, and their instant response makes the Cross Turismo feel faster than many supercars in certain situations. 

More affordable 4 and 4S models offer 375bhp and 483bhp respectively, but still with four-wheel drive, as the name suggests. A rear-wheel-drive-only version is unlikely given the Taycan Cross Turismo's rugged pretensions. Driving range is up to 283 miles in the 4, decreasing to 260 miles in the flagship Turbo S version. While this is reasonable for a high-performance EV, the Porsche can also be topped up very quickly - at charging speeds up to 270kW.

The Taycan Cross Turismo won't be on everyone's shopping list - it starts from well over £75,000 - but for those in the market for a supercar-fast estate, it's a desirable new contender. Not only can it out accelerate most rivals, it has all the zero-emissions advantages of an EV and uniquely desirable looks.

MPG, running costs & CO2

A decent range is backed up with high charging speeds

For the moment, there's no such thing as a ‘basic’ version, so even the cheapest Taycan 4 Cross Turismo gets a 93.4kWh battery. With lots of performance and chunky alloy wheels and tyres, however, the Cross Turismo isn't completely efficiency-focused, so its range of up to 283 miles is relatively average.

Choose the even-faster 4S Cross Turismo, and while power increases quite considerably, its official range figure only dips to 281 miles. It's a similar story for the Turbo, which has one mile cut from its range figure, but the flagship Turbo S takes a bigger hit, with range reduced more noticeably to 260 miles. A heat pump is optional, which improves efficiency by using waste heat from the powertrain to warm the car's interior. This is said to be a particular benefit in colder weather, so is a worthy consideration for UK owners.

Porsche's 800-volt electrical architecture means the Taycan Cross Turismo can take advantage of very fast charging, of up to 270kW. At this speed, owners can expect to add around 62 miles of range in five minutes, while a 0-80% top-up takes just over 20 minutes. A more common 50kW public charger will take around 1.5 hours to get the car to 80%, while a full charge from an 11kW home wallbox takes around nine hours. 

VED (tax) is currently free for electric cars, and while petrol super-estates like the Mercedes-AMG E63 and Audi RS6 are in the very top Benefit-in-Kind (BiK) band, the Taycan Cross Turismo is in the lowest. The factory where the Taycan Cross Turismo is built in Stuttgart, Germany, is carbon-neutral, and drivers can use the infotainment system to filter charging stations to see those that only use green energy.

Engines, drive & performance

Otherworldly acceleration and low centre of gravity give the Cross Turismo searing pace

The Taycan Cross Turismo range is only available with four-wheel drive at launch, kicking off with the 375bhp 4 and 483bhp 4S. Porsche also includes an 'overboost' feature, which can temporarily increase power for faster acceleration. For the 4S, output shoots up to 563bhp when this engages. Zero to 62mph acceleration is 5.1 and 4.1 seconds respectively, which should be easily quick enough for the vast majority of drivers.

Serving up 616bhp in normal driving, the Turbo can overboost to 671bhp, for a neck-straining 0-62mph acceleration time of 3.3 seconds. The Turbo S has the same standard power output but hits an even more lofty 751bhp during overboost, for a 2.9-second 0-62mph dash.

While supercar-beating acceleration times aren't foreign to estate cars - the Mercedes-AMG E63 S boasts a 3.4-second 0-62mph time - the Taycan CrossTurismo's pace and lack of noise do make it feel like a spaceship with wheels. Press the accelerator too sharply and you'll find your head bouncing off the headrest, such is the instant response. 

Despite its weight and taller height, the Cross Turismo boasts a level of driver involvement that can't be matched by an EV from any other brand. It turns sharply and a low centre of gravity helps it resist body lean remarkably well. Traction and grip are virtually unimpeachable on the road but not at the expense of feel, thanks to an excellent suspension setup and precise steering. 

Interior & comfort

A smooth ride and impressive features add to the Taycan Cross Turismo's strengths

Even in its firmest Sport Plus mode, the Cross Turismo’s ride remains pliant enough to avoid upsetting passengers. The softest mode still feels most suited to a back road, though, helping the car remain settled as it flows from one corner to the next.

As well as altering the level of performance, the various versions of Taycan Cross Turismo also serve as trim levels. The base-level 4 gets 19-inch alloy wheels, LED headlights and PASM with air suspension. There's half-leather trim inside, along with dual-zone climate control, and owners can add certain features like semi-autonomous driver aids later on, via the Porsche Functions on Demand system.

Stepping up to 4S adds features like adaptive headlights and subtly different exterior trim, while there's a bigger leap to the Turbo. This has leather upholstery, powered front seats with a memory function, heated seats all-round and a Bose stereo system. It also looks slightly different, thanks in part to 20-inch alloy wheels. The Turbo S goes even further, with Porsche's Sports Chrono upgrades, ceramic brakes, rear-wheel steering and sports seats that don't use real leather.

Practicality & boot space

A longer roof adds passenger and boot space

While it's by no means a replacement for a Range Rover, there's an extra 30mm of ground clearance and more plastic cladding around the bottom of the Cross Turismo compared with the regular Taycan. This should make owners happier to take their Taycan Cross Turismo across a field, down a gravel track or up a snowy road to their ski chalet. Top Turbo S versions also get rear-wheel steering, which helps reduce the turning circle for easier manoeuvring.

The Taycan Cross Turismo's extra interior space is likely to be more useful day-to-day. Thanks to its longer and taller roofline, there's 47mm extra headroom for anyone in the back seats, while 446 litres of boot space isn't bad either - the standard Taycan has 366 litres. This expands to 1,212 litres with the seats folded down, while the Turbo versions have slightly lower figures of 405 litres and 1,171 litres. Every version also gets 84 litres of storage in a 'frunk' under the bonnet.

Reliability & safety

A five-star Euro NCAP score will appeal to the safety conscious

The 'J1' platform found under the Taycan was completely new, and is now being rolled out for the Audi E-Tron GT and Taycan Cross Turismo. It's still very early to predict its reliability but we haven't heard of any major issues so far. Not enough Porsche owners responded to our 2020 Driver Power survey for the brand to be included, but Audi and Volkswagen came 16th and 17th out of 30 manufacturers respectively.

While many Porsche models aren't tested by Euro NCAP, the Taycan has been assessed, and awarded the full five-star rating. Considering the Taycan Cross Turismo is virtually identical ahead of the windscreen, we imagine this score will apply here too.

The latest safety equipment from the Volkswagen Group is fitted, including a system called InnoDrive that can help drive the Taycan Cross Turismo within its lane, keep pace with traffic and even help with overtakes. Autonomous emergency braking and rear cross-traffic alerts help avoid collisions, while night vision is also available to help spot pedestrians and other objects in the dark. 

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