In-depth reviews

BMW M3 saloon review

“The BMW M3 is still one of the very best sports saloons”

Carbuyer Rating

4.1 out of 5

Pros

  • Very fast
  • Fantastic interior
  • Still as spacious as regular 3 Series

Cons

  • Running costs
  • Divisive looks
  • Some rivals are cheaper

The BMW M3 nameplate is an iconic one and has represented the pinnacle of the BMW 3 Series range for 35 years. This is the latest, sixth-generation model, and it offers more performance, more tech and more aggressive styling than ever before. It’s sold alongside the BMW M4 coupe; this time around there will be a long-awaited BMW M3 Touring estate model too.

Even standard BMW 3 Series models look athletic, so BMW has pulled out all the stops to make the M3 stand out. Park the two side-by-side and you’ll notice much wider wheel arches and a carbon-fibre roof. There are also spoilers and side skirts, plus a large rear diffuser and four exhaust pipes. The front end is borrowed from the BMW 4 Series - it’s different from the standard 3 Series - and includes full-height grilles, sharp lines and bonnet bulges.

Fastest saloon cars

The M3 renews its rivalry with the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio and Audi RS5 Sportback, and a new version of the Mercedes-AMG C63 is inbound. There’ll be an estate version of the C63 to rival the Audi RS4 and the first-ever M3 Touring, which will join the range in 2022.

Other markets get the choice of two versions - a standard model and the BMW M3 Competition. Only the latter is available in the UK, as that’s the version UK customers tend to buy; it’s the same story with BMW’s other M performance models. The Competition has more power than the standard model and is only available with an automatic gearbox.

While the last M3 maxed out at 444bhp, the new M3 Competition offers 503bhp, knocking a tenth of a second off the 0-62mph time. All cars are rear-wheel drive from launch but a four-wheel-drive version will be on sale later this year. Running costs, as you might expect, will be much more expensive than a standard 3 Series.

MPG, running costs & CO2

Expect frequent fill-ups with the BMW M3

Given the performance on offer, running costs are always going to be high - and the M3 is expensive to buy in the first place. In fact, it’s £15,000 more than the last M3 was when it went on sale in 2014. According to the WLTP economy test, the BMW M3 manages 27.7mpg and 234g/km. Some of its rivals manage over 30mpg but this is unlikely to be a concern as most owners won’t be using their M3s for long motorway journeys frequently. Less than 20mpg is probably more realistic in the real world.

Because the M3 costs more than £40,000, you’ll pay the extra surcharge for VED tax until the car is six years old. If you’re going to have the M3 as a company car, you’ll pay the top rate in BiK tax due to its high CO2 emissions. Maintenance will probably also be more expensive than a regular BMW 3 Series, and the cost of consumables, such as tyres and brakes, will be high. We’d also recommend getting insurance quotes before you buy one, as the M3 will be expensive to insure. At least the three-year warranty is the same as the standard car.

Engines, drive & performance

The BMW M3 leaves very little to complain about here

The price of the M3 may have increased but so has the power. Other countries get a 473bhp ‘entry-level’ M3 but UK buyers only get to pick the M3 Competition, which packs 503bhp. It means the M3 now cracks 0-62mph in under four seconds. It’s only one or two tenths quicker than the old model, so it might not feel drastically quicker than the previous M3.

Near-endless settings make it possible to set up the M3 exactly how you want it, and it also allows the car to be comfortable when cruising; the car remains a four-door saloon, despite the performance, and you might want to do some long journeys in it. The new M3 feels a bit more mature and sophisticated than the old one but it’s still exciting.

With all the settings turned up the M3 is a different beast, capable of racetrack hot laps and embarrassing some outright sports cars. The fantastic chassis lets you know exactly what is going on, and the steering is quick and accurate. It’s a lot sharper than the old M3 and just a whisker off the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio in that respect.

There’s more grip than you’d expect from a 503bhp rear-wheel-drive car too, perhaps because the car now weighs over 1,800kg. Not that you can feel its heft from behind the wheel, the car instead feeling nimble and agile.

BMW needed to fit certain devices to make sure the M3 passed the latest emissions regulations, and they’ve muted some of the engine noise you used to hear. The exhaust sounds a bit muffled, even with the sports exhaust activated, but we don’t have any other gripes about the M3 driving experience.

Interior & comfort

The BMW M3’s smart interior is bolstered by exclusive sporty touches

A high-quality interior comes as standard in the BMW 3 Series, including the brand’s latest infotainment system and a good balance between touch controls and physical buttons. The M3 stands out with a few red buttons, lots of M badges and racier sports seats - which you can spec in bright orange or blue if you wish. Carbon fibre-backed bucket seats are available as an eye-catching option.

Standard equipment includes a digital instrument cluster with M-specific graphics, adaptive suspension, parking assistance, heated front seats and upgraded LED headlights with high-beam assist. A carbon-fibre exterior pack is a £4,100 option. If you get too carried away with the options, you can bring the cost of the M3 to £100,000; that’s enough to buy a more powerful BMW M5 Competition.

Practicality & boot space

The M3 is based on the very practical BMW 3 Series

While you’d expect the BMW M4 to be a little less practical because it’s a coupe, the same can’t be said for the M3. This is the one you’d buy if you need to carry people in the rear seats on a regular basis. Adults will be happier in the back than in the M4 and having a rear set of doors makes it easier to get kids in and out.

The standard BMW 3 Series is very spacious, so it’s the same story with the M3 - although we expect rear legroom and visibility will be slightly affected by the bigger sports seats. There are a few handy storage cubbies dotted around the cabin and a big 480-litre boot behind the seats. Each rear seat can be folded individually, so the M3 can be even more practical if you need to use it for big items. The four-wheel-drive model, due later this year, might cut into boot space a little, while those that need a bigger boot or a hatchback will be keen on the upcoming M3 Touring estate.

Reliability & safety

A five-star safety rating but owner satisfaction could certainly be better

The BMW M3 won’t be tested by Euro NCAP because it shares parts and crash structures with the 3 Series but that car’s five-star rating means it’s no issue. It scored 97% for adult protection, which is one of the best results in the history of the test. Standard safety equipment includes auto emergency braking, lane-keeping assist and adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go functionality.

BMW came 27th out of 30 brands in our 2020 Driver Power customer survey, which is hardly something to shout about. Neither is the fact that one in five owners reported a fault in the first year. Most premium German brands were towards the bottom of the list, however, and the equipment on offer - in particular the iDrive infotainment system - was praised.

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