Skip advert
Advertisement
In-depth reviews

Skoda Fabia review - a great-value, practical supermini

"A size increase serves the Skoda Fabia well, making it an ideal supermini for families"

Carbuyer Rating

4.4 out of 5

Owners Rating
Be the first to review
Price
£19,700 - £25,600

Pros

  • Very practical
  • Comfortable
  • Great value for money

Cons

  • No hybrid model
  • Not much fun to drive
  • Some bland interior trim

Verdict - Is the Skoda Fabia a good car?

The Skoda Fabia is one of our favourite superminis because it performs well and offers very strong value for money. Skoda has a tradition of offering class-busting models and the Fabia is no exception, with five doors, respectable rear legroom and boot space that’s on par with family hatchbacks from the class above. While it’s a shame there aren’t any electrified options, the Fabia’s simple, but tried-and-tested petrol engines also offer decent driving manners with low running costs, and it’s a surprisingly comfortable supermini for longer trips.

Skoda Fabia models, specs and alternatives

The Skoda Fabia has been a huge success, with more than 4.5 million finding homes around the world since it launched around two decades ago. Customers appreciated the affordable running costs, space and sturdy build quality.

The best hatchbacks 2023 heroTop 10 best hatchbacks 2024

Introduced in 2021, the latest Fabia shares its underpinnings with the sporty SEAT Ibiza, as well as the slightly more premium Volkswagen Polo. The result is a significant size increase over the old model, and access to much more modern infotainment and safety technology.

Advertisement - Article continues below

Skoda has become synonymous with practicality, and the new Fabia is a key example of why. The supermini now boasts a class-leading 380-litre boot, which is way bigger than the Ford Fiesta and comes close to matching cars from the class above. Not only that, but there's also more space for passengers and child seats, giving the Fabia more versatility than ever.

Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

As features continue to trickle down from bigger models, the Fabia feels increasingly upmarket. An update in 2024 even upgraded all trims to include more equipment than before. Four trim levels are currently available, called SE Comfort, SE L, Colour Edition, and a sporty Monte Carlo model. Every version of the Fabia now gets a digital gauge cluster, with SE Comfort fitted with an eight-inch unit that replaces the old analogue gauges. The infotainment system also gets a size increase across the board. The higher-spec models get ‘big car’ features such as a heated steering wheel and a panoramic sunroof.

One area where the Fabia perhaps isn't quite as advanced as rivals is under the bonnet. Most buyers will get a 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol engine that can manage around 50mpg but there's no hybrid or even mild-hybrid assistance. Buyers can spec this engine in a variety of power outputs from the basic MPI versions with 79bhp, or a more powerful TSI variant with either 94bhp or 114bhp. Entry-level engines get a five-speed manual gearbox, with the most potent getting a choice of a six-speed manual or a DSG automatic. A more powerful 1.5-litre four-cylinder petrol engine is available in the range-topping Monte Carlo model; this produces 148bhp, making it the fastest version of the Fabia currently on sale.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

None of that means the Fabia will be expensive to run, but those seeking innovation or a cheap company car might prefer one of the hybrid powertrains offered in the Toyota Yaris, Renault Clio E-Tech or Honda Jazz, which can run on electric power for at least some of the time.

On a more positive note, the new Fabia is better to drive than the old one. Skoda engineers have chosen to make the new car’s suspension softer than the Fiesta or Ibiza; it's not as sporty as a result but it rides very well and feels relaxed over long distances.

The Fabia was awarded five stars by Euro NCAP, a score that will reassure owners. The Fabia uses a number of tried and tested engines shared with other models, so it should generally prove reliable. However, in our Driver Power brand satisfaction survey, Skoda fell to a concerning 20th place out of 32 manufacturers. Owners weren’t too impressed with Skoda’s technology, but praised the brand’s undeniable value for money.

MPG, running costs & CO2

The Skoda Fabia offers cheap petrol motoring but there's no hybrid model

Like a number of its supermini rivals, the Skoda Fabia is only offered with petrol engines, as sales of small diesel cars continues to shrink. It also appears unlikely the Fabia will be released as a hybrid - if you're looking for one of those, you'll need to stick with the Toyota Yaris, Renault Clio E-Tech or Honda Jazz.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

Instead the Fabia offers simple, affordable motoring with small three-cylinder petrol engines that are economical. Most are just 1.0-litres in size and there is also a 1.5-litre four-cylinder if you need extra performance. The latter will also be affordable to run as the smaller engines, thanks to clever technology that can shut down two cylinders when the engine’s full power isn’t required.

Skoda Fabia MPG & CO2

The slight increase in size of the latest Fabia has not affected its efficiency. Even the most powerful 1.5-litre TSI petrol with 148bhp can officially return around 50mpg in sporty Monte Carlo trim, fitted with an automatic DSG gearbox. Meanwhile, CO2 emissions start from 118g/km, a figure that’s fine for private buyers but won't suit company-car drivers due to a high (BiK) Benefit-in-Kind banding.

Most drivers will instead pick one of the frugal 1.0-litre TSI petrol engines. These are available in two different power outputs – 94bhp and 114bhp – and can both manage around 55mpg, with CO2 emissions as low as 115g/km. While 1.0-litre cars sit in a slightly lower BiK band than the flagship 1.5-litre model, both will still attract a higher tax bill than hybrids such as the Toyota Yaris and Honda Jazz. While these rivals will be more efficient around town, there’s little to differentiate between them if you do lots of motorway miles, as they will all achieve economy figures in the low-to-mid 50s at higher speeds.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

Acting as the entry-point to the range, the non-turbocharged 1.0-litre MPI engine is offered in the Fabia with a 79bhp output. Despite being less powerful, it’s unlikely to be any cheaper to run than the turbocharged TSI engines, managing up to 55mpg and emissions starting from 116g/km. The main saving here is the cost of buying the car itself, but considering a TSI engine is only around £500 more, we'd recommend upgrading unless you need a particularly low insurance group.

All versions of the Skoda Fabia are liable for VED (road tax) at the standard rate from the second year of ownership onwards.

Insurance groups

Strangely, the closely related Volkswagen Polo with the same entry-level 1.0-litre MPI engine as the Skoda Fabia starts from insurance group one, despite having a slightly more upmarket image in comparison – the Fabia starts from group four, so it’s still one of the cheapest cars to insure in the UK, and is cheaper to buy than the Polo in the first instance. The 1.0-litre TSI model increases to insurance group 10, while the 1.5-litre TSI sits in group 19 out of 50, which will make it pricey to insure for young drivers.

Warranty

While Skoda does most things right, its three-year/60,000-mile warranty is starting to look rather poor next to some offerings from rivals, although it does still match the likes of Ford and Volkswagen. Hyundai offers a five-year/unlimited-mileage policy, while Kia offers seven years of cover. Toyota has a new 'Relax' warranty that can last up to 10 years. Skoda Fabia owners can extend their warranty coverage for up to two extra years or 100,000 miles for prices ranging from between £250 to just over £500.

Servicing

Skoda offers competitive servicing prices and it can be a good idea to take out a fixed-price servicing plan when (or shortly after) you buy the car. These plans cover two or three years, and cost around £15 a month, and cover the cost of scheduled maintenance, helping to spread the cost and avoid large bills.

Engines, drive & performance

The small Skoda offers a reassuring big-car feel

While the outgoing Fabia soldiered on with parts from much older cars, the latest model now gets newer technology and a significant size increase. It's especially noticeable how much wider it is and this improves stability, which has always been a Fabia trademark. Now it feels even more solid and secure, and does a good job of convincing you it's a larger car from the driver's seat.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

We wouldn't go so far as to call it sporty because the Fabia still feels more focused on comfort than the Hyundai i20. Instead, its steering feels more natural and it has a level of polish that moves it much closer to the Volkswagen Polo and Renault Clio.

Skoda Fabia petrol engines

Skoda only offers the Fabia with front-wheel-drive and petrol power, however, there are a few different engines to choose from. The range-topping 1.5-litre powertrain was previously only available on Monte Carlo, though as of 2024 it’s available on Colour Edition and above and produces a potent 148bhp. While this is no match for the likes of the Volkswagen Polo GTI, the Fabia Monte Carlo feels relatively brisk. Unlike the rest of the Fabia range, this model is only available with a seven-speed DSG gearbox; getting from 0-62mph takes around eight seconds.

The mid-range turbocharged 1.0-litre TSI is familiar to anyone who has driven any small Volkswagen Group cars over the last few years. This is available in 94bhp or – as of a 2024 update – 114bhp outputs, with the latter taking 9.3 seconds to get from 0-62mph. Both engines can be specified with either a six-speed manual or the aforementioned DSG automatic; the DSG can be slow to respond at times, and acceleration is often accompanied by an obtrusive grunt from the engine.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

During normal driving, the engine is far quieter at low revs, with a smooth and subdued character. It’s impressive at motorway speeds, where the engine noise is barely noticeable over road noise, which can be quite loud at times. For most drivers, we expect the slick manual gearbox will provide a more satisfying driving experience over the DSG automatic.

It’s also very comfortable for a supermini, with a softer ride that makes it relaxing to drive. The handling is fairly neutral too, with a numb steering feel meaning the Fabia lacks the fun factor or driver involvement possessed by rivals such as the Renault Clio. However, regardless of the lack of fun, the Fabia offers precise and secure handling for a supermini, and is one of the most refined you can buy.

Unless you're a young driver who needs the lowest possible insurance group, or you only occasionally leave the town and suburbs, we'd avoid the 1.0-litre MPI engine. While its 79bhp might not sound too far off the 94bhp of the cheapest TSI engine, the lack of a turbocharger means it has around half the pulling power. This gives it a 0-62mph time of 15.6 seconds (versus 10.7 for the 94bhp TSI engine) and it feels like harder work to drive as a result, with overtakes requiring serious planning and a long stretch of clear road. While its short gearing and slick manual gearbox mean even the MPI can feel perfectly adequate in urban settings, we found it is especially sensitive to hills, which almost always require shifting into a lower gear to maintain momentum.

Interior & comfort

The Fabia's interior is no-frills but has all the essential features

As it’s much larger than before, the Fabia's interior has been transformed. It now blurs the boundaries between supermini and family-sized hatchback, and could see some buyers reconsidering which model they need.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

In keeping with its new grown-up personality, the Fabia is more refined than before too. Not only is its ability to soak up a rough road commendable, it's also good at keeping wind and tyre noise at a low hum.

While the interior doesn’t rewrite the rulebook, its controls are exactly where you’d expect them, and the quality of materials is better than you might expect of a car from a budget-focused brand. That said, there is a notable disparity between the front cabin, which feels expensive, and the rear passenger compartment, which makes use of seemingly much worse-quality material, with hard plastic rear door trims and manual window winders in lower trims.

Skoda Fabia dashboard

Moving to the same underpinnings as the Volkswagen Polo and SEAT Ibiza hasn't just increased space, it has also given Skoda's designers access to a new generation of technology. This means its infotainment is far more contemporary, with a central touchscreen measuring up to 9.2 inches in size. This setup looks modern and boasts slick graphics that are easy to read but it is slightly slower to load and less responsive than some rival systems.

While analogue gauges are still standard, an optional digital instrument display is also available in the Fabia for the first time, and it feels a world away from the basic dials fitted into earlier generations of Skoda’s supermini. We’re not sure how much people will use some of its screen layouts, though, including one which just shows the car's speed and range in a large font – presumably to avoid other distractions on a long motorway drive at night.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

The dashboard itself is also a new design, with a swish horizontal piece of body-coloured trim that intersects circular air vents. Another highlight is some fabric trim (from SE trim upwards), similar to the Octavia and Enyaq iV but overall materials are kept fairly simple. 

A two-spoke steering wheel is a neat design touch and the rotary dials for the ventilation controls are easy to use while driving along a bumpy road. The extra width of the interior has also allowed for more plentiful storage and even a wireless smartphone charging tray.

Equipment

A minor update to the Fabia range in 2024 brought an improved specification across the board. Gone are the entry-level models’ analogue dials, so now all cars get at least an eight-inch digital driver’s display, and the infotainment screen now starts from 8.25 inches in size.

SE Comfort is now the most basic trim, with surprisingly powerful LED headlights and several exterior additions including front fog lights, 15-inch alloy wheels and rear parking sensors above the now discontinued S trim. Inside, upgrades include height adjustability for the front seats, a two-spoke leather-trimmed multifunction steering wheel and matching trim on the gear lever and handbrake.

Colour Edition gets further styling enhancements including a contrasting roof colour, larger 16-inch aerodynamic alloys and rear privacy glass, and upgraded technology inside with a 10.25-inch digital dial cluster, 8.25-inch infotainment screen and keyless start. If you’re simply after an affordable supermini, this would be our pick of the range.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

Next up, the SE L trim adds substantially to the equipment list. It gets a larger 9.2-inch infotainment screen, dual-zone air conditioning, ambient interior lighting, LED interior lights, a front armrest and all-round electric windows.

Topping the Fabia lineup is the new sporty Monte Carlo trim. To set it apart from the regular models, it gets several sporty design tweaks, including a gloss black front grille, redesigned bumpers, and model-specific 17-inch alloys. Other upgrades include special Monte Carlo badges, LED headlights and foglights, and tinted rear windows. Inside, sports seats are fitted along with red and black contrasting trim.

Practicality & boot space

The Skoda scores well here, thanks to a generous interior and huge boot

The Skoda Fabia has long been marketed as the sensible supermini for customers in need of space, and the latest model is a big step up again in that regard. Measuring a considerable 111mm longer than before, with 94mm extra bodywork between the front and rear wheels, you may wonder if you still need that Skoda Scala, Ford Focus or Volkswagen Golf, as the Fabia’s interior is one of the most spacious in its class.

Skoda Fabia interior space & storage

Even on the outside, the latest Fabia is close to the size of a Golf and with five doors as standard, it's also very easy to get in and out. Rear passengers will find a bench that's easily wide enough for two adults, with three now less of a squeeze than before. Buyers looking to use the Fabia as a family car will be able to make use of the car’s three separate ISOFIX mounting points – most cars in this class just make do with two.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

Those in the front will find lots of space, with more shoulder room and good visibility. The driving position should be comfortable for a wide range of body shapes, with good adjustment for the seat and steering wheel.

If you're the sort of person who can't leave the house without armfuls of stuff, the Fabia will also suit you perfectly. There are large door bins, lots of cubbies and the glovebox is able to swallow a surprising amount. We also really like the USB-C socket on the rear-view mirror, which is perfect for powering a dashcam. It’s not perfect, though, with a pair of cupholders between the front seats that are too small for some coffee cups and a lack of dedicated charging ports for rear passengers.

Boot space

And that's before we've got to talking about the boot, which at 380 litres is something of a star attraction. It matches the volume of the Volkswagen Golf and Audi A3 from the class above, and is a vast 50 litres bigger than the old Fabia. It also gives the Fabia a serious practicality advantage over rivals like the Toyota Yaris and Ford Fiesta, with boots measuring just 286 litres and 311 litres respectively. 

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

The Fabia has 60:40 split and fold rear seats but the boot floor isn't adjustable – folding down the rear seats frees up 1,190 litres of boot space. There are some clever features, like an ice scraper tucked in the fuel filler hatch and an umbrella in the front door. You can also specify a folding front passenger seat, which frees up space for particularly long items.

Reliability & safety

It might be small but the Skoda Fabia is strong and safe

While the Skoda Fabia is too new for data on its reliability to be available, the closely related SEAT Ibiza and Volkswagen Polo both feature in our latest Driver Power survey. The Fabia also gets more safety kit than ever before and received a five-star rating when tested by Euro NCAP.

Skoda Fabia reliability

The mechanically similar Volkswagen Polo came 62nd out of the top 75 models in our latest Driver Power survey, with decent scores for its powertrains and running costs. With similar engines but more space, we'd expect the Fabia to go ahead of this when it arrives in the rankings. Considering its sister car has been out for a few years, Skoda should also be able to capitalise on making any reliability improvements amassed during this period. In our Driver Power brand survey, Skoda came just ahead of VW (27th) and SEAT (23rd) finishing 20th out of 32 manufacturers. Buyers praised the value-for-money and practicality of their Skoda models, while there were complaints regarding the in-car tech.

Safety

It might be a supermini but the Fabia is clearly targeted at families, so it's great to see features like the option of a top and bottom ISOFIX child-seat mounting for the front passenger seat. Other safety technology will include self-parking devices and Travel Assistant, which can steer the car and adjust its speed in heavy traffic.

Unlike the outgoing Fabia, the latest version gets the full gamut of driver aids like lane-keeping assistance, blind-spot warnings and alerts to tell the driver if traffic is present as they are reversing out of a parking space or driveway.

When the new Fabia was crash-tested by Euro NCAP in late 2021, it achieved a full five-star rating. The model performed strongly in all areas, earning 85% and 81% scores for adult and child occupancy respectively, plus a 70% score for vulnerable road user protection and a 71% rating for its safety assistance systems.

Full LED headlights and rear lights are standard, boosting visibility and ensuring other traffic can spot the Fabia in poor conditions. A heated windscreen is also available to help clear ice and condensation in winter.

Skip advert
Advertisement

Which Is Best?

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.0 MPI 80 SE Comfort 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £19,700

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.0 TSI Colour Edition 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £21,050

Fastest

  • Name
    1.5 TSI 150 Colour Edition 5dr DSG
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £24,265

Andy is Carbuyer's managing editor, with more than a decade of experience helping consumers find their perfect car. He has an MA in automotive journalism and has tested hundreds of vehicles.

Skip advert
Advertisement

Recommended

Retro throwback! Fiat Grande Panda channels iconic 1980s hatch
Fiat Grande Panda front quarter
News
14 Jun 2024

Retro throwback! Fiat Grande Panda channels iconic 1980s hatch

Dacia Duster crowned UK’s best car to own in Driver Power survey
Dacia Duster front quarter
News
12 Jun 2024

Dacia Duster crowned UK’s best car to own in Driver Power survey

Ford Kuga review - a sharp-handling and efficient SUV
Ford Kuga facelift
In-depth reviews
11 Jun 2024

Ford Kuga review - a sharp-handling and efficient SUV

SEAT Ateca review – good value SUV that's fun to drive
SEAT Ateca SUV front 3/4 tracking
In-depth reviews
7 Jun 2024

SEAT Ateca review – good value SUV that's fun to drive

Most Popular

Engine management light: what to do if it comes on
Engine warning light
Tips and advice
12 Jun 2024

Engine management light: what to do if it comes on

Best new car deals 2024: this week’s top car offers
Carbuyer best new car deals hero
Deals
14 Jun 2024

Best new car deals 2024: this week’s top car offers

New Alpine A290: fast, stylish and very blue electric hot hatchback revealed
Alpine A290 front quarter
News
13 Jun 2024

New Alpine A290: fast, stylish and very blue electric hot hatchback revealed

Top 10 best cars for students 2024
Best cars for students
Best cars
6 Jun 2024

Top 10 best cars for students 2024

Affordability, safety and practicality are top priorities for students – these 10 cars are your best options
Top 10 best cheap cars 2024
The best cheap cars
Best cars
19 Apr 2024

Top 10 best cheap cars 2024

Everyone likes a bargain – here are the best cheap cars on sale in 2024
Top 10 best first cars for new drivers 2024
The best first cars 2023
Best cars
17 Apr 2024

Top 10 best first cars for new drivers 2024

A good first car needs to be many things, including affordable, reliable and safe. Here’s our pick of the best
Top 10 cars with the biggest boots
The cars with the biggest boots
Best cars
12 Apr 2024

Top 10 cars with the biggest boots

If carting cargo is your priority, our top 10 list of the biggest car boots is sure to be of interest, whatever your budget
Top 10 best small company cars 2024
Best small company cars
Best cars
23 Feb 2024

Top 10 best small company cars 2024

Are you after a small company car with equally compact Benefit-in-Kind bills? These 10 cars should be on your shortlist
Top 10 best Motability cars 2024
Best Motability cars
Best cars
12 Jan 2024

Top 10 best Motability cars 2024

Here are our picks of the best cars available to Motability users in the UK
Best insurance group 4 cars
Skoda Fabia hatchback
Best cars
5 Jan 2024

Best insurance group 4 cars

Here are all the new cars currently available in insurance group four
Top 10 best cheap cars to insure
Best cheap cars to insure
Best cars
3 Jan 2024

Top 10 best cheap cars to insure

Whether you’re after a supermini or an SUV, here’s our list of the best cars with low insurance premiums
Skip advert
Advertisement
The safest cars to buy in 2024
2023 safest cars - header
Best cars
2 Jan 2024

The safest cars to buy in 2024

Looking for peace of mind when out on the road? Here are the safest cars according to independent crash-test body Euro NCAP
Top 10 best used small cars 2024
The best used small cars hero 2023
Best cars
2 Jan 2024

Top 10 best used small cars 2024

Looking for a small, sensible secondhand buy? We name 10 of the best small used cars
Top 10 best hatchbacks 2024
The best hatchbacks 2023 hero
Best cars
2 Jan 2024

Top 10 best hatchbacks 2024

Hatchback models are hugely popular thanks to the practicality of a large boot opening. Here we take a look at some of the best hatchback models of al…
Top 10 best small cars and superminis 2024
The best small cars and superminis 2023
Best cars
2 Jan 2024

Top 10 best small cars and superminis 2024

The best small cars and superminis aren’t just cheap to buy and run, those at the top of the class are also stylish and fun to drive
Skoda Fabia vRS review (2010-2014)
Skoda Fabia vRS
In-depth reviews
16 Oct 2023

Skoda Fabia vRS review (2010-2014)

"The Skoda Fabia vRS offered impressive performance and handling without costing the earth."
Skoda Fabia hatchback - Interior & comfort
Skoda Fabia hatchback
In-depth reviews
11 Sep 2023

Skoda Fabia hatchback - Interior & comfort

The Fabia's interior is no-frills but has all the essential features
Skoda Fabia hatchback - Practicality & boot space
Skoda Fabia hatchback
In-depth reviews
11 Sep 2023

Skoda Fabia hatchback - Practicality & boot space

The Skoda scores well here, thanks to a generous interior and huge boot
Skoda Fabia hatchback - Reliability & safety
Skoda Fabia hatchback
In-depth reviews
11 Sep 2023

Skoda Fabia hatchback - Reliability & safety

It might be small but the Skoda Fabia is strong and safe
Skoda Fabia hatchback - Engines, drive & performance
Skoda Fabia tracking front
In-depth reviews
11 Sep 2023

Skoda Fabia hatchback - Engines, drive & performance

The small Skoda offers a reassuring big-car feel
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skoda Fabia hatchback - MPG, running costs & CO2
Skoda Fabia hatchback
In-depth reviews
11 Sep 2023

Skoda Fabia hatchback - MPG, running costs & CO2

The Skoda Fabia offers cheap petrol motoring but there's no hybrid model
London ULEZ: what is the Ultra Low Emission Zone?
ULEZ Zone
Tips and advice
21 Aug 2023

London ULEZ: what is the Ultra Low Emission Zone?

The London ULEZ will expand on 29 August 2023 to cover all of the city’s boroughs. Our guide explains what it means for drivers in London
Top 10 best cars with three ISOFIX points
Peugeot 3008 Hybrid
Best cars
10 Jan 2023

Top 10 best cars with three ISOFIX points

Most cars come with just two ISOFIX child seat mounts, but many families need three. Our list runs down the best options available
Skoda Fabia vs VW Polo vs SEAT Ibiza: which should you buy?
Fabia vs rivals pictures
News
30 Mar 2022

Skoda Fabia vs VW Polo vs SEAT Ibiza: which should you buy?

Find out which of these top superminis is best for you with our handy comparison
New 2022 Skoda Fabia Monte Carlo starts from £20,925
2022 Skoda Fabia Monte Carlo
News
4 Mar 2022

New 2022 Skoda Fabia Monte Carlo starts from £20,925

Skoda has lifted the covers off the new top-of-the-range Fabia Monte Carlo, which gets sportier styling and extra power
Top 10 best cars for £15,000
Kia Picanto X-Line
Best cars
16 Feb 2022

Top 10 best cars for £15,000

If your budget for a new car is £15k, you can choose from an appealing selection of hatchbacks and SUVs. Here are the best ones

Tips & advice

View All
Car dashboard warning lights: the complete guide
Car dashboard symbols and meanings
Tips and advice
26 Mar 2024

Car dashboard warning lights: the complete guide

Electric car charging stations: a complete guide
Public EV charge point
Tips and advice
11 Jan 2023

Electric car charging stations: a complete guide

PCP vs HP – which type of car finance is right for you?
PCP vs HP
Tips and advice
17 May 2022

PCP vs HP – which type of car finance is right for you?

Average speed cameras: how do they work?
Average speed cameras: how do they work?
Tips and advice
21 Mar 2024

Average speed cameras: how do they work?

Best cars

View All
Top 10 best car interiors
Peugeot 208 hatchback
Best cars
25 Jun 2021

Top 10 best car interiors

Top 10 best electric cars 2024
Best electric cars
Best cars
16 May 2024

Top 10 best electric cars 2024

Top 10 best cheap-to-run cars 2024
The best cheap-to-run cars 2023
Best cars
2 Jan 2024

Top 10 best cheap-to-run cars 2024

The UK's top 10 fastest hot hatchbacks 2024
Fastest hot hatchbacks hero
Best cars
2 Jan 2024

The UK's top 10 fastest hot hatchbacks 2024